New HDD, how to partition and have permissions after<SOLVED>

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ScottQuier
Posts: 1781
Joined: 18 Jul 2013 15:55
Location: Newport News, VA

Re: New HDD, how to partition and have permissions after

Postby ScottQuier » 06 Mar 2014 11:47

Orbmiser wrote:Well in KDE there is a gui settings way to have partitions automatically mount on boot (See my Image above).
Without the need to edit fstab. I've never had to edit it in any distro I have tried.

5 internal partitions 3 windows ntfs and 2 ext4 and two separate usb drives.
.
OK - well, I learn something every day. Thanks.
Scott
Quoting zerozero, "The usage of PPA's in debian-based
systems is risky at best and entails serious compatibility
problems; usually it's the best way to destroy an install"

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ScottQuier
Posts: 1781
Joined: 18 Jul 2013 15:55
Location: Newport News, VA

Re: New HDD, how to partition and have permissions after

Postby ScottQuier » 06 Mar 2014 11:49

phazon1 wrote:um...actually, after re-boot, I still have access to it. I guess what ever I did at the terminal during the last session "stuck".

I might mark this as solved...
It "stuck" because you told the O/S what to mount and where to mount it. On boot, the O/S reads fstab for this information. This is how your "main" drive gets mounted on boot. You just added one more to the list.
Scott
Quoting zerozero, "The usage of PPA's in debian-based
systems is risky at best and entails serious compatibility
problems; usually it's the best way to destroy an install"

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ilu
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Joined: 09 Oct 2013 12:45

Re: New HDD, how to partition and have permissions after<SOL

Postby ilu » 06 Mar 2014 12:56

Sorry I kept things short in my to-do-list yesterday, I wasn't shure you would come back to your post.
Anyway, onto your questions
1. Start gparted, write partition table and partitions the way I want them.
right off the bat, I don't know what "the way I want them" means. what might be "the way you want them"?
I just meant: create as many partitions as you like and choose your filesystem. Everybody has his and her own preferences and needs there.
2. Start Terminal and find out UUIDs with sudo blkid
what is a "UUID" and what do I do with this information once gotten?
There are 2 ways to refer to partitions in fstab
- The traditional (lets say relative) way by using sda1, sda2 etc. Problems might arise if you have more than one hd and you hapen to change their SATA slots. My situation: After installing SolydX I added another harddisk and suddenly the one formerly known as sad appeared as sdb. Thats confusing the system (and me), obviously.
- the newer "absolute" way by using an identifier called UUID which is unique to every partition (but might change if you modify the partition, so beware!).
I'm using UUID because I change around hardware alot. You might get along with sda/sdb ...
3. Create mountpoints whereever I want them with sudo mkdir
where is "where ever I want them"? give an example
I think 20 years ago harddisks where mounted in a directory called /mnt. It's still there and I use it for that purpose. Other people/distros prefer /media. You could also mount into your /home if you wanted (this woul affect rights, obviously)
4. Open fstab with sudo mousepad /etc/fstab, copy an existing line and edit mountpoints and the UUIDs I found before, save.
Plese explain what "copy an existing line and edit mountpoints" means, please give an example
fstab might look like this:

Code: Select all

# /etc/fstab: static file system information.
#
# <file system> <mount point> <type> <options> <dump> <pass>
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
# /dev/sdc2
UUID=daf232c2-cf35-4ed6-a443-3fc8a678ddfe / ext4 rw,noatime,nodiratime,discard,errors=remount-ro 0 1
# /dev/sdb8
UUID=b5d
f7a31-a753-4541-a48f-89457f8c1fa7 /var ext4 rw,errors=remount-ro 0 0
# /dev/sdb6
UUID=1a9d1c50-03e1-4fe9-8321-ec5ef03ef957 /home ext4 rw,errors=remount-ro 0 0
# /dev/sdb5
UUID=5c8c8c4d-7dc8-42c6-a9fb-3ec2894412c3 none swap sw 0 0
# /dev/sda1
UUID=(some random number here) /mnt/DATA ntfs defaults 0 0
# /dev/sdc3
UUID=5EEDD9FE22A94021 /mnt/SHARED ntfs rw,noatime,nodiratime,discard,errors=remount-ro 0 0
Don't touch the first lines, 4 in this case, thats necessary system stuff. For each partition you can add a new line like the one you obviously added. The last line in my above example shows you some of the additional parameters you could use if you wanted (it's an SSD in this case). Usually defaults are just fine.
5. sudo mount -a
This much I understood, but will this "take" and remain this way for the next boot up, or do you have to take all of these steps each time I am on the computer?
Yes, and no.
Also, there is a question that everyone seems to be glossing over here, why did I NOT have to do ANY of this stuff with the 60 gig drive? I just created partitions and off I went on my merry way, I had full access to the storage partition from every distro. WHY?
Because the system does this for you during install - that's in the first fstab lines.

Under KDE there probably is that graphic tool you can use, under XFCE there doesn't seem anything like that. I stick to XFCE because I don't need tools for every purpose.

Now back to my sound problem, *there* I would need a tool .... ;)


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