Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Questions about SolydX and SolydK installation.
flyinraptr
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Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Postby flyinraptr » 08 Aug 2014 18:35

I've been running Solydk on a regular desktop computer for around 8 months - very happy with it and have no plans on changing my OS. I am however planning on a hardware change - after 20+ years of acquiring and building desktop computers - looking to consolidate down to a laptop + docking station. I am looking at the Asus Q55OLF which comes pre-loaded with Windows 8.1. I haven't decided whether to have a dual boot or just wipe it and install Solydk - my concern is that that uninstalling Win 8.1 will void the warranty. So i have been researching various Linux/Laptop forums (including this one) for how to setup the dual boot and what i am finding is the steps are over the place with varying degrees of success. I am wondering if the Solydk team has a recommended "Best Practice" procedure for installing the latest version of Solydk on a laptop pre-installed with Windows 8.1 or even an "unofficial method" of setting up a dual boot that has proven to work consistently?

Keep up the good work .... thanks,

Greg
I gotta keep breathing. Because tomorrow the sun will rise. Who knows what the tide could bring? ~ Chuck Nolan

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Orbmiser
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Re: Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Postby Orbmiser » 08 Aug 2014 19:10

my concern is that that uninstalling Win 8.1 will void the warranty.
It doesn't void the warranty. Most laptops either have a small hidden recovery partition which can revert laptop back to factory defaults. Or comes with recovery DVD's that do the same thing.

Only 2 issues to look out for is newer laptop with UEFI Bios may or may not be a bear to install linux on.
Second have to be careful not to delete the hidden recover partition. At least until warranty period is over.
And of course checking that hardware,graphics,wifi,bluetooth,sound,trackpad,etc including Hibernate,resume is all supported in Linux. As laptops are more difficult to get everything working out of the box.

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flyinraptr
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Re: Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Postby flyinraptr » 08 Aug 2014 19:30

Thanks for the reply. I'll have to take a look at the warranty small print. So essentially, in the event of a warranty repair, you have to do a factory restore. A pain but doable. I believe the Asus warranty is 90 days - this model is a Best Buy exclusive so I'm sure they'll pitch their extended warranty which may have different limitations.

From the research I've done so far hardware compatibility doesn't seem to be an issue with the Asus. The UEFI seems to be a common problem in general and specifically with Solydk. I read where the most recent version of Mint is now compatible with UEFI laptops. Mint is a good option but I would prefer to continue to use and support Solydk.
I gotta keep breathing. Because tomorrow the sun will rise. Who knows what the tide could bring? ~ Chuck Nolan

_q_
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Re: Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Postby _q_ » 08 Aug 2014 19:45

as stated, will not void warranty.

i bought a new laptop with the new fangled bios replacement... it varies on UEFI systems what things you have to change to make it deal with a boot disk... on mine, i had to turn off the UEFI locks AND enable legacy devices to work (also had to turn on hooks for the VM stuff to work, but that is off topic) and it was NO ISSUE AT ALL to put Solyd on.

i went through the steps to resize the Win 8 partition and was careful not to blow away my restore partition and i got Solyd to work juuuust fine... about 15 minutes into the Win 8 side though, i sadly lost interest in having that excuse for an OS installed and just blew all the Windows partitions away and made my new lappy Linux only... technically, i have win 7 in a VM, but i didnt even add the reg key after installing it... i guess i am finally done with Redmond :twisted:

anyway, the "hard" part is getting 8.1 to play nice with its boot loader, but its not really a big deal... i just had better things to do and my OS of choice was playing nicely.

i went with the Intel video chipset because it seems to cause the least issues with *nix.

if i was going to go all best practices with it, i would do it like so:

go get a Redo Backup Live disk from here: http://redobackup.org/

make a copy of your virgin Win 8 machine... grabbing all hidden partitions too (this one is important). put the backups on your old machine that you are on now, a stack of DVDs(i THINK it does this) or an external hard drive.

then you can start playing with it with ease and security and ALWAYS put it right back to new... even after upgrading a hard drive.

next, resize your Windoze install partition and make sure you put that chunk before the Linux partitionS.

the Windoze boot loader really wants to stay on the first sector of the drive, so dont move that.

then you will install Solyd.

finally, you should be able to hack the boot loader and call it a day.

after you get Solyd installed, go back and change your UEFI settings to make your machine more secure... me, i left mine open though cause well, i play around and hardware level security is NOT a concern for me.

that should get you started till someone actually cares enough about Win 8 to leave it installed and make a tutorial :lol:

as for the *nix side of things... Good Practice is make a swap partition, a root partition and a /home partition at the very least.

install the OS, update the OS and get your drivers squared away, then install your software packages and THEN modify your system with all the eye candy and features you want.... for me, this has always provided a nice and clean, functional Debian install.

might be a good idea to hit the redo disk again after you are done and do the whole machine ;)

congrats on the new surfboard! :mrgreen:

SolydXK is such a delicious flavor of Debian!

flyinraptr
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Re: Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Postby flyinraptr » 08 Aug 2014 20:23

Awesome - thanks!!!! I like the clean Solydk approach (thanks for the info on Redo Backup) and have never been a fan of dual boot. I think i'll forego screwing around with dual-boot and go that route. On my current desktop PC - i run Solydk and use PlayOnLinux to run Quicken and then VirtualBox with a Win7 virtual guest to run any Windows programs that won't play nice with PlayOnLinux - hence no real need (other than my warranty concern) for a dual boot (i have no desire to use Win 8.1 unless absolutely forced to do so at gunpoint LOL). The only other thing i'll need to think about then is a new Tv Tuner - my current desktop has a pci - TvTuner card - will need to find a USB TV Tuner that is compatible.

Another thought that might be fun to try is - a physical to virtual migration using my current desktop and the new laptop. Certainly VMware has physical-to-virtual tools will have to see if VirtualBox has any. Theoretically - i would create a virtual instance of the new laptop on my current desktop and after i have rebuilt the laptop with Solydk and VirtualBox - i could copy the virtual instance over to the laptop and have available as a guest running under VirtualBox.
I gotta keep breathing. Because tomorrow the sun will rise. Who knows what the tide could bring? ~ Chuck Nolan

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ScottQuier
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Re: Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Postby ScottQuier » 08 Aug 2014 20:43

Slightly off-topic but relevant I think ....

I've been hit or miss with Asus laptops. My current one - the video card is flakey; went bad about 2 years after I bought. My son bought a Sager about 3 years ago. That thing is near bullet-proof - if a bit heavy (it has a desktop i7 in it, but he bought it as a desktop replacement).

I was so impressed with it that I did some research and found that XoticPC offers a pretty good deal and you can get it with or without software from Redmond.

Disclaimer: I have no relationship with XoticPC aside from being a very happy customer.
Scott
Quoting zerozero, "The usage of PPA's in debian-based
systems is risky at best and entails serious compatibility
problems; usually it's the best way to destroy an install"

flyinraptr
Posts: 29
Joined: 10 Dec 2013 16:45

Re: Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Postby flyinraptr » 08 Aug 2014 21:03

ScottQuier wrote:Slightly off-topic but relevant I think ....

I've been hit or miss with Asus laptops. My current one - the video card is flakey; went bad about 2 years after I bought. My son bought a Sager about 3 years ago. That thing is near bullet-proof - if a bit heavy (it has a desktop i7 in it, but he bought it as a desktop replacement).

I was so impressed with it that I did some research and found that XoticPC offers a pretty good deal and you can get it with or without software from Redmond.

Disclaimer: I have no relationship with XoticPC aside from being a very happy customer.
Yeah - i haven't pulled the trigger yet ... just getting my ducks in a row before doing so. From the reviews on the Asus Q55OLF - the WiFi module was an issue early on - but they replaced it with the newer version and doesn't seem to be a problem any longer. The Sager - is impressive and obviously built for gaming ... i don't do as much gaming these days and if i do it is typically on the Xbox. I like the available options - very tempting to bump up the ram and storage but with that comes a higher price tag. Definitely - something to consider.
I gotta keep breathing. Because tomorrow the sun will rise. Who knows what the tide could bring? ~ Chuck Nolan

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ScottQuier
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Re: Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Postby ScottQuier » 08 Aug 2014 22:37

flyinraptr wrote:
ScottQuier wrote:Slightly off-topic but relevant I think ....

I've been hit or miss with Asus laptops. My current one - the video card is flakey; went bad about 2 years after I bought. My son bought a Sager about 3 years ago. That thing is near bullet-proof - if a bit heavy (it has a desktop i7 in it, but he bought it as a desktop replacement).

I was so impressed with it that I did some research and found that XoticPC offers a pretty good deal and you can get it with or without software from Redmond.

Disclaimer: I have no relationship with XoticPC aside from being a very happy customer.
Yeah - i haven't pulled the trigger yet ... just getting my ducks in a row before doing so. From the reviews on the Asus Q55OLF - the WiFi module was an issue early on - but they replaced it with the newer version and doesn't seem to be a problem any longer. The Sager - is impressive and obviously built for gaming ... i don't do as much gaming these days and if i do it is typically on the Xbox. I like the available options - very tempting to bump up the ram and storage but with that comes a higher price tag. Definitely - something to consider.
Not trying to sell the machine to you ... but what gaming I do (solitare, mahjongg, etc) does not push the CPU. I got the least pimped-out box they had and it's been working a real treat for my photo editing (which can push the CPU and memory) and s/w develoment (right now, just python and glade). The idea is that one can get a "gaming" machine and use it for something else.

As for the pricing - for the CPU and memory (8G, with room to double that if I choose) and the very good potential that the machine will be servicable for the next 5 - 8 years (I'm hoping), the price isn't too bad. Especially when I think about the fact that my Asus machine was only about $50 less (when I bought it) and it's now not much good for anything.

Again - I'm not trying to sell you on anything. Just another slant on the purchase decision.
Scott
Quoting zerozero, "The usage of PPA's in debian-based
systems is risky at best and entails serious compatibility
problems; usually it's the best way to destroy an install"

flyinraptr
Posts: 29
Joined: 10 Dec 2013 16:45

Re: Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Postby flyinraptr » 08 Aug 2014 23:29

ScottQuier wrote:
flyinraptr wrote:
ScottQuier wrote:Slightly off-topic but relevant I think ....

I've been hit or miss with Asus laptops. My current one - the video card is flakey; went bad about 2 years after I bought. My son bought a Sager about 3 years ago. That thing is near bullet-proof - if a bit heavy (it has a desktop i7 in it, but he bought it as a desktop replacement).

I was so impressed with it that I did some research and found that XoticPC offers a pretty good deal and you can get it with or without software from Redmond.

Disclaimer: I have no relationship with XoticPC aside from being a very happy customer.
Yeah - i haven't pulled the trigger yet ... just getting my ducks in a row before doing so. From the reviews on the Asus Q55OLF - the WiFi module was an issue early on - but they replaced it with the newer version and doesn't seem to be a problem any longer. The Sager - is impressive and obviously built for gaming ... i don't do as much gaming these days and if i do it is typically on the Xbox. I like the available options - very tempting to bump up the ram and storage but with that comes a higher price tag. Definitely - something to consider.
Not trying to sell the machine to you ... but what gaming I do (solitare, mahjongg, etc) does not push the CPU. I got the least pimped-out box they had and it's been working a real treat for my photo editing (which can push the CPU and memory) and s/w develoment (right now, just python and glade). The idea is that one can get a "gaming" machine and use it for something else.

As for the pricing - for the CPU and memory (8G, with room to double that if I choose) and the very good potential that the machine will be servicable for the next 5 - 8 years (I'm hoping), the price isn't too bad. Especially when I think about the fact that my Asus machine was only about $50 less (when I bought it) and it's now not much good for anything.

Again - I'm not trying to sell you on anything. Just another slant on the purchase decision.
Thanks - appreciate the perspective. I'm going to do a configuraton/spec comparison and see where it stands. Have you ever had to deal with Sager's support? Any issues with running linux/soldyk?
I gotta keep breathing. Because tomorrow the sun will rise. Who knows what the tide could bring? ~ Chuck Nolan

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ScottQuier
Posts: 1781
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Location: Newport News, VA

Re: Solydk Laptop Install - Best Practice???

Postby ScottQuier » 09 Aug 2014 00:04

No ... And no. The machine, both mine and my son's, has been rock solid. The GPU on my machine is Intel and there was one small issue when I was running the KDE spin, something to do with GPL, but that was quickly resolved. If I had to do it over again, I would not hesitate.
Scott
Quoting zerozero, "The usage of PPA's in debian-based
systems is risky at best and entails serious compatibility
problems; usually it's the best way to destroy an install"


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