So what's your take on Manjaro?

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smackthepony
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby smackthepony » 15 Jun 2014 13:33

Why not go full monty and install pure Arch? It's easy to install (even easier with AUI script)
I have been using Arch + Mate with compiz for a while without any problems. I tried the Manjaro Mate edition and it failed hopelessly.
btw if you want some fun go ask for help on arch forums don't forget to mention you use Manjaro (that should spice up your weekend :evil: )
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Rocky
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby Rocky » 15 Jun 2014 13:44

I am looking at a live USB of Manjaro Openbox at the minute and I must say I like it. Default theme is a bit garish but this is not hard to change . I particularly like the Openbox ability to have customisable key bindings so I can press say Alt-B and the browser comes up. Wonder if this is possible in Debian/SolydXK ?

On the other hand I have invested time in learning about Debian/Debian based and not sure I now want to switch to another (Arch) base.
"All that glisters is not gold" - Shakespeare "The Merchant of Venice"

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smackthepony
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby smackthepony » 15 Jun 2014 14:04

Rocky wrote:Wonder if this is possible in Debian/SolydXK ?
Keybindings In KDE through here
snapshot.jpg
I'd imagine XFCE will have a similar option
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Rocky
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby Rocky » 15 Jun 2014 14:23

smackthepony wrote:Why not go full monty and install pure Arch? It's easy to install (even easier with AUI script")................btw if you want some fun go ask for help on arch forums don't forget to mention you use Manjaro (that should spice up your weekend :evil: )
Yeah - seems to be a feeling that re spinning Arch (ie Manjaro) is against the Arch philosophy . I have also come across the idea elsewhere that respins ( any base not just Arch) would be better contributing to the base distro rather than effectively creating a fork/derivative. I can certainly see the logic in this argument:
  • The multiplicity of Linux distros is confusing and leads to duplication of effort
  • Users of respins give up a certain amount of freedom ie defer to distro creators ideas about how the distro should look
On the other hand :
  • Surely the whole philosophy of Free / Opensource is that you can take the software , amend it , repackage it as you wish ?
  • It can save a lot of time using a derivative rather than having to tediously tweak the base to get to your desired result - the distro creator puts a great deal of time into the "tweaking " etc eg look at the time Schoelje ( and the team ) freely puts into SolydXK
Rocky
"All that glisters is not gold" - Shakespeare "The Merchant of Venice"

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jsalpha2
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby jsalpha2 » 15 Jun 2014 14:28

Orbmiser
they allow you to select installing grub on other but with text "Not recommended"
I try a lot of distros and also don't like having my bootloader messed with. Some distros give you the option to not install a bootloader at all. Upon reading more on this, it may also cause problems. (Edited to remove bad advice.)

sobe I have tried Bridge Linux several times. It has gotten much better, but they still refuse to include a GUI Package Manager like Pacman. I've destroyed my install each time trying to use the command line to install PacmanXG. It is very easy to get slammed over there if you don't do everything their way. (Kind of like the Debian forum.)

smackthepony First I've heard of the AUI script. I've been following the developement of Jeff Story's Evo/Lution Live CD / Graphical Installer for Arch Linux http://sourceforge.net/projects/evolutionlinux/ and http://evolution.boardhost.com/index.php Arch is one of the distros I've never tried. I may take a shot at it soon. I don't think the have or approve of a Package Manager either. So I may not keep it around long.
btw if you want some fun go ask for help on arch forums don't forget to mention you use Manjaro (that should spice up your weekend :evil: )
Now you did not do that did you? I may have to go read the responses!

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smackthepony
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby smackthepony » 15 Jun 2014 15:05

jsalpha2 wrote:Now you did not do that did you? I may have to go read the responses!
Haha no way you get flamed, burned, beheaded and whatnot if you try that.
I take it you read Jeff Story's experiences on the arch forums?
I never got FURCH working properly (which is basically just Antergos). AUI is commandline driven mostly.
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Longshot
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby Longshot » 16 Jun 2014 04:52

I have always used Debian/Debian based systems and have no wish to change that, I'm a Debian guy and proud of it. I did try Manjaro because a guy I knew wanted a rolling distro, this was before I found SolydX. I always like to try them out myself before I tell someone the best bet I know of for what they are looking for. I'm a Cinnamon fan so I tried the Cinnamon version and I did not really have to many problems bit it was just not for me, I think this was mostly due to me liking Debian so much, but on the whole, I can see why Manjaro as well as Arch has such a big fan base.

Transitman
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby Transitman » 17 Jun 2014 01:47

I installed Manjaro Netbook Edition on my Latitude 2100 and it works quite well. I was surprised.
The last OS I installed on a Netbook was Lubuntu 12.04 on my ancient Asus EEEPC900.

Now if only SolydXK had a Netbook edition.....

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Orbmiser
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby Orbmiser » 17 Jun 2014 02:22

Transitman wrote:I installed Manjaro Netbook Edition on my Latitude 2100 and it works quite well. I was surprised.
The last OS I installed on a Netbook was Lubuntu 12.04 on my ancient Asus EEEPC900.

Now if only SolydXK had a Netbook edition.....
Hmmm I've read many having satisfied results with Xfce edition and even one that had 2gb netbook satisfied with KDE version.

And of all the lightweight DE seems they all fall within 100mb of each other. So don't know personally from experience how well the different distro's handle netbooks. Generally as I see it wanting function,features over stripped down less features. My full KDE with all effects chimes in at 290mb to desktop. And after starting Firefox,Skype or some other app. I would think that 100mb-150mb savings going Lxde,Openbox,Xfce,etc.. would become a mute point once you are running apps and such.

Wondering if you have tried other options besides netbook spins?
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Transitman
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby Transitman » 17 Jun 2014 12:01

I had a SolydX installed on a HP mini, but it ran slow, compared to the XP edition that was on it.

Both the HP and the Dell have about the same specs, but I am finding that Windows 7 on the Dell is a bit slower and Manjaro Netbook flies.

From what I've read, it has to do with stripping down the OS and modifying the kernel to accommodate the Netbook specs.
It is also running an altered version of XFCE made for the Netbook Edition.

The Lubuntu 12.04 on my Asus is not the fastest in the world, but it gets the job done for what I set it up for.

yoast
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Re: So what's your take on Manjaro?

Postby yoast » 08 Aug 2014 19:42

Any new experiences on Manjaro 0.8.10?

I have been giving it a small initial test in virtualbox. In fact, I am typing this in Firefox running in Manjaro inside a Virtualboxc under SolydK.

My findings so far:
1. Manjaro installed without any problems and updated 433 modules with its standard Octopi tool.
2. I then installed some of my favourites: Doublecommander (from repo) , Kingsoft Office (from the website, extracted the xz file to a folder under /opt/ and installed the fonts under /usr/share/fonts/ ), yura's domination by running the standard java with the -jar. I also installed teamdrive by downloading the *.run file and running that. Libreoffcie, Kingsodft office etc. all worked.
3. I then installed Total Commander in Wine bioth the 64 and 32 bits versions. WOW64 must be working fine. I used the 64 bit version to install irfanview. (had to run winetricks to install the mfc42.dll). All worked in one go.
4. I then installed devolo-cockpit from the UAR this worked in one go. Then Google-Chrome as well. Also worked in one go.


My Opinions on the differences so far (Without serious testing or over-time monitoring):

1. The Manjaro installer offers LVM-based disk encryption and offers the choice between a separate home-partition or a standard install. Excellent. User friendly with standard options, but advanced with its possibilities. I loved it. Manjaro has an edge over Solyd on this front.
2. The Wine install runs with WOW64 straight out of the box and can seamlessly run both 64 and 32 bit apps. Manjaro has a slight edge on this front.
3. Standard install scripts with *.sh or *.run extensions run fine in both Manjaro and SolydXk. A draw. Both are generic and stable.
4. When *.deb files are offered you can use general tar-balls or use the UAR. This can reduce the stability of your system, of course. Solyd has a clear edge on this front. Most debian based packages can be used.
5. Both Solyd and Manjaro function downstream from larger repositories. Solyd has the stability more in mind and Arch has the new features more in mind. I would give Solyd the edge on this, but it is a matter of taste.

I found that Manjaro allowed me to start working in a seriously short amount of time, using graphical UIs exclusively (Octopi is a front-end for the UAR as well). Within hours I was working on work-docx-files without any problems and doing standard tasks.

I will run Manjaro in virtualbox for a while to see just how good it is over time and if it will be broken by updates. If Manjaro holds I will certainly consider it as a fall-back option.

I love solyd and I will stick with it because of its closeness to server/LTS based reliability, but I must admit that Manjaro is succeeding in convincing me that arch-based is not necessarily unstable/messy. If Manjaro succeeds in laying down a stable base for the most-used software-packages and combines that with a stability that can draw in and retain beginning users than it could be a really nice alternative. It is already close to the top 10 on distrowatch.

What are your experiences and expectations?
a. Will it become stable enough so beginning users can run it for years with hardly any intervention? (on a limited set of installed software, of course.).
b. Has it clearly become more stable over time? Or is my uptake of 8.10 one of the more stable exceptions?

I know this is an older thread, but I just found I liked Manjaro.

cheers,
Y.


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