Howto market SolydXK

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EldreThe
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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby EldreThe » 14 Aug 2013 17:23

Schoelje wrote: I've been playing with the idea. To make it more realistic. Don't make a lot, but send them to editors of magazines to start with.
Ahh, see that's the practical business consultant at work. High exposure effect-to-cost ratio.
Schoelje wrote:...now the budget...
Hey, you said no matter how unrealistic. I deliberately left out my idea of building a DeathStar with SolydXK logo into Earths orbit just to consider the budget!
Best Regards

Eldre, The

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Arjen Balfoort
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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Arjen Balfoort » 14 Aug 2013 17:40

EldreThe wrote:Hey, you said no matter how unrealistic. I deliberately left out my idea of building a DeathStar with SolydXK logo into Earths orbit just to consider the budget!
This is what I think:
Iframe is not allowed anymore. Click here to watch the movie.


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RalphB
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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby RalphB » 14 Aug 2013 20:24

Schoelje wrote:
RalphB wrote:How about social networking?
That is an approach that not too many distros take.
'Facebook, twitter, google+
Sure vwe have a facebook page but its only a small stepping stone, we could make it into a launchiung platform promoting the distro.
Solyd also has a youtube channel, lets make that channel a hub for users of Solyd.
What would have to be done to reach businesses, and non-profit organizations that way?
Now that is where the tricky bit is.
Most businesses stay away from social networking, its the employees who should be the target.

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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Omega » 26 Aug 2013 07:47

There are really only a handful of rolling release distros, but out of all of them, only Manjaro and SolydXK seem to have a similar goal, but I think Solyd leans towards stability while Manjaro leans towards cutting edge.

SolydXK is a very unique flavor of Linux in this regard, and the people sick of reinstalling their OS every couple months will want to try this new approach to Linux.

SolydXK has replaced Kubuntu for me since I no longer have to deal with outdated LTS system nor reinstall every 6 months to their normal releases. This happy medium is what I've been waiting for.

SolydK Home Edition 64Bit
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Fargo
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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Fargo » 18 Sep 2013 14:53

Yesterday I wrote a very lengthy and detailed response to this thread with some very indepth thoughts on marketing and what a small business owner such as myself look for in a distro. I spend over an hour putting it all together for you guys. Unfortunately, my session timed out by the time I clicked Submit and I lost it all. I was very frustrated about that. It happens in a work forum I frequent too. Anyway, I don't have time to go into all of that again today so I will try to summarize it the best I can.

First off I look for STABILITY. Traditionally this means a fixed release. I can't have my system changing underneath me. I tried a rolling release with PCLinuxOS years ago and although the system itself was very stable, the updates often changed things underneath that would cause programs or sometimes periferals like printers to no longer function properly. I haven't tried your Update Package system yet, so I really can't comment on it. You might be on to something really good hear. However, it still needs to be tested over a long term test to see what happens after a series of updates are done over a few years. So although I really like the UP idea, I am inclined to stick with a Stable distro like Mepis (my current choice) or KWheezy.

However, I see a huge opportunity for Solyd to also create a LTS release on Debian stable. Basically I would recommend doing something like KWheezy does. Use a pure Debian base and simiply add the Solyd tools and tweaks to it. Such as your device manager, driver manager and other programs like Firefox and Thunderbird which Debian does not include. Then you can simply let the LTS release roll on using the Debian repos and maybe one of your own just to keep a few programs up to date. I think it would be wise for Solyd to get in contact with KWheezy to ask about using their distro as a base for an LTS release. It seems to me this could be beneficial to both projects. Kwheezy could gain some tools from Solyd and Soloyd would gain an LTS release along with a maintainer the KWheezy repos. Seems like a win win to me. This would be a great fit in the closed source business world. Unfortunately, Linux has trouble completely such mergers.

On top of stability the biggest need is simplicity. Programs should be easy to install and maintain. This means no command line stuff. I should be able to install software and drivers or update the OS with a few clicks of the button. I think Solyd is on the right track with things like the Device Drivers Manager.

Finally the biggest hurdle will be mostly outside of Solyds hands. That will be programs. People are used to their windows programs and when they can't find them they think their is no Linux alternative. The biggest one for businesses is the lack of Quickbooks. I did come across a program called TurboCash that looked really nice. Unfortunately, it is for Windows only. But maybe someone can look at the source code to see if it can be ported over to Linux. Solyd could really differentiate themselves in the small business section and even in the home user section by focusing on getting different programs onto the platform. Also things like Virtualbox should be installed and ready to go so all the user has to do is drop in their appliance or do their windows install. Play on Linux or other wine programs should also be easiliy available. Although, I question if they should be preinstalled.

In short I really like what Solyd has to offer me as a small business user. Unfortuneatly, I am very adamant about stability and I don't know if I trust anything outside of Debian Stable. So I do hope that Solyd looks at an LTS Debian stable release. Something like KWheezy seems like a good start. Fortunately its not too late for a LTS based on Wheezy. There are other Debian Stable releases like Mepis and Saline that still have not released their release. With a few backports of their tools and sharing repos with Kwheezy, I think Solyd could have a fantastic LTS release only a few months away. Which may still beat Mepis and others to the market.

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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Arjen Balfoort » 18 Sep 2013 15:24

Interesting thought.
I see some technical implications, but it deserves a good discussion.
Let's see what the community thinks about this.


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Fargo
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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Fargo » 18 Sep 2013 16:20

Schoelje wrote:Interesting thought.
I see some technical implications, but it deserves a good discussion.
Let's see what the community thinks about this.
I am glad to hear you are open to a Debian Stable LTS. I realize it is more work, but I think it would really help Solyd to reach out to both groups of people. A Debian Stable LTS release would give a business user the known stability of Debian Stable, with all the Solyd extras, along with an option to try a familiar semi-rolling release down the road. Particularily as Stable gets older. I can also see some people wanting a LTS on one computer and a rolling release on another. By providing a Debian Stable Solyd LTS along with the semi-rolling Solyd, they can choose a familiar OS for either occation. By keeping the Solyd LTS based on a more pure Debian Stable (with the addition of the Solyd tools and non-free programs with updates like KWheezy) it would keep maintenance of the LTS to a minimal. Not to mention the time and effort that might be saved by actually basing the first LTS off of KWheezy. I look forward to hearing the communities thoughts on this.

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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby EldreThe » 18 Sep 2013 20:11

I'll weigh in on this soon. Battery almost out and I'm on vacation.

Fargo, thank you for the input. As I'm not a small business owner, I lack a certain perspective and yours is valuable to me.

Will respond soon.
Best Regards

Eldre, The

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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Crewp » 18 Sep 2013 23:30

Ok, heres my 2 cents. Years ago AOL targeted there audiance by mailing disks with there software on it. There are ALOT of fustrated Windows users out there that would take a shot at something new, something stable, something that you dont have to up grade your hardware for. If we could get disks of SolydXK out there. I think it could catch. This is not without cost so it should be small targeted steps, to see if it results in user demand. Or a small mailing guiding people to your website, to download SolydXK.

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timber
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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby timber » 19 Sep 2013 00:16

I'm picturing a 'Pavilion' of sorts.

A website, easy on the eyes, graphic and educational with interactive paths.
It could be as basic or as complex as resources and creativity allow.
Imagine anything from "LibreOffice Impress type presentation pages" to "game-like (I'm imagining Mist-like) scenes".
No banners, no ads, not your average webpage appearance ... something unique and different requiring involvement and/ or interaction.

Picture the Home page:
Simple but effective: Perhaps a close-up, perspective view of a large, nicely bound book with title "SolydXK". (As if sitting on Library table waiting to be read). (Or other, something that "kindles the imagination", makes one wonder what's inside).
Could be a nice desktop computer that you turn on, something indicating getting started, something new and peaking curiousity ...

Next page: (Or second scene)
An overall view, perhaps a panorama centering on the "SolydXK Linux" 'pavilion'. (A pavilion, to me, represents something big, something interesting and fun, something that is community yet worldwide - Business and Leisure).

The setting, a modern, clean, generic, international landscape. (Again as simple or complex as desired).
Faint, distant mountains or hills in background, blue sky, forest or woods on the periphery, fields then park-like then some structures then city as moving toward the pavilion in the center. (Symbolic, stylistic, realistic, game-like or cartoon, whatever but artistic and/ or graphic in nature).

Selecting the center (pavilion) takes you to a new page, large, open, well lit, glass enclosed lobby with three interesting kiosks.
Like an entry to stadium or worlds fair perhaps ...
One kiosk is marked with large K at top, perhaps with SolydK logo and monitor front and KDE logo on side(s),
one is marked with large X at top, perhaps with SolydX logo and monitor front and Xfce logo on side(s),
third is marked with MS at top, perhaps with Win8, monitor on front and symbol indicating windows on side. (Nothing infringing or negative)

From here, the possibilities are endless but selecting one of the kiosks would take you to an entrance, a basic introducton to each.

Going to the MS kiosk would take you to (another page) the MS entrance and could, in some way, indicate business and games (rides), ubiquitous in nature in the background but with ...
A pay station (toll booth or checkin counter with cash register and many prices listed).
After paying (selecting cash register or wallet) you are taken to ...
roped off waiting lines (like airport security), business and games in background but restrictions etc. in foreground such as ...
Having to address and wade through Bloatware, Promotions, Ads, Sign-ups, Purchases and signing for long Authentication keys (with possible errors and/ or rejections after purchase) ... click each, fill in codes then on to ...
Next waiting line to configure Firewall then go through screening, fenced with metal detector perhaps ...
After that a line to purchase Virus Protection (with RED warning signs), download, register, wade through more promotions, ads, configurations etc ...
Move to next line to "purchase" Office software, PhotoShop, download, register, wade through more promotions ...
Once you finally get in it's a bit slow (crouded) progress, ... more lines/ waiting, perhaps even complex "help" mazes that lead nowhere ... more purchases, ads, malware etc ...
(Point is not to slam MS, it has it's place but it does have cost, restrictions, vulnerabilities and advertising/ bloatware and useless help that rarely has a viable solution, Linux on the other hand does not have all this. Perhaps a tamed down scenerio indicating these major differences is appropriate).

Going to the X kiosk (it's own page) takes you to wide open entrance, Free to all, which could indicate open, clean, stable, fast, gnome freshness and artistic gnome features, generous supply of things to do and easy access to more well thoughout, "Free Software". All of which are tailored for Business and Home, Photo, Art, Web, Games (PlayOnLinux, Steam), ability to bring new life to older, slower hardware ... etc.

Going to the K kiosk (it's own page) takes you to wide open entrance, Free to all, which could indicate open, clean, stable, fast, kde freshness and sparkle, beautiful themes, generous supply and access to well thoughout, Free Software for Business and Home, (etc as above), ease of transition from Windows OS ... etc.

Once instide X or K part of the pavilion there could be other kiosks (e.g. an Information kiosk) with links to tutorials, downloads, introductions, reviews etc. ... and, as all good websites, a means to navigate back to lobby, to X pavilion, K pavilion or other (perhaps a Navigaion kiosk if that's the theme).

Just some thoughts of possibilities to peak interest (curiousity), promote getting involved (interactive) and display the wonderful characteristics of Linux in general (Open, Free, Secure (Business, Servers, Home), Community, Growing ...) but specifically SolydX & SolydK (Secure, Stable, Rolling, Regular UP, Nice selection of Software, easily Customized etc).

It's a graphic way to introduce the world to SolydXK and demonstrate how nice it is ...
... all while being Free, Easy to use, Secure, Without Restriction and Compatible with Windows if that's what you want (that's the Linux way). I think something like this cold make SolydXK stand out in a positive way.

The web, of course, is how we communicate concepts and ideas in this day and age.
A website set up to be interactive, somewhat like an RPG or as a Business Presentation (which, could even be an option and use many of the same pages) may seem daunting at first but, as you know, a website is basicly just a set of interlinked pages.

It could be a community project where concepts, ideas, artwork and promotion come together, over time, to let the world know that we are the wonderful world of SolydXK. Done right, it could benefit SolydXK and educate the masses and differentiate SolydXK from the rest of the crowd.

Just a thought ... :)
timber

Samsung R580-M430 @ 2.27GHz - 8 GB RAM
Geforce 310M w/ nvidia-driver
SolydX/SolydM - Kernel 3.14-2-amd64 - Update Pack: 2014.07.15
SolydK - Kernel 3.14-2-amd64 - Update Pack: 2014.07.15
SolydKBE - Kernel 3.2.0-4-amd64 - LTS Update Pack: 2014.07.15

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zerozero
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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby zerozero » 19 Sep 2013 02:39

even a mountain changes but unless there's a cataclysm the change is subtle and you can always tell that it's a mountain.
bliss of ignorance

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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Arjen Balfoort » 19 Sep 2013 06:57

For adoption: new home page for the main site:
http://forums.solydxk.nl/viewtopic.php?f=53&t=1502


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ane champenois
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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby ane champenois » 21 Sep 2013 06:59

Schoelje wrote:Interesting thought.
I see some technical implications, but it deserves a good discussion.
Let's see what the community thinks about this.
I've never been maintainer of a network myself, but I had to meet and work a few years ago. I can say that they hate having more and more work because of new versions of softwares, libraries and so on, espacially if the system changes a lot.
So if the number of updates could be less numerous, they perhaps could be more interested with Solyd products. LTS could be a real advantage.
to finish, let's have a look on Mozilla firefox: when they decided to have 6 week regular updates, they created Firefox ESR (extended support release) witch uses the same mechanism.
See here: http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/organizations/faq/
IMHO: the way of LTS is interesting.
They did not know it was impossible so they did it.

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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Sewedob » 21 Sep 2013 20:19

I don't know if this is the right topic, but I want to let you know that I asked Arindam Sen from Linuxed - Exploring Linux distros (A non-techie's view of the Linux world) http://mylinuxexplore.blogspot.nl/ to write a review about SolydXK:

Hello Arindam, I read your reviews for quite a while now. I like your style and the fact that you don't use foul language, to me you are always a gentleman to people.

After exploring and using Ubuntu, Mint, Mageia and Manjaro, I am using SolydXK (formerly known as the Unofficial LMDE KDE) as my KDE (4.11) distro at the moment, and I think I will stick to it for quite a while.

It is based on Debian Testing, and is updated each month (semi-rolling release). It is not bleeding edge but very up to date. It has a small but active forum user base, with people who are not "fan boys", but who want to help each other out.

Can you please review this distro in the near future, IMHO it is very stable and deserves more publicity.

Thank you from a Dutch Linux user !

(http://mylinuxexplore.blogspot.nl/2013/ ... esome.html)

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Arjen Balfoort
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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Arjen Balfoort » 21 Sep 2013 22:39

Sounds great, and if he can wait for a day or two, he'll have brand new iso's to try out!


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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby JOM » 05 Oct 2013 16:06

There is an important and excellent computer magazine in Germany called "c't magazin". http://www.heise.de/ct/
Regularly, they include installation CD/DVDs in their issues, covering new and interesting OSes and/or software.
(This BTW is where I have first found an Ubuntu disk and decided to try Linux, back at the time when Unity in Natty Narwhal was released for the first time.)
Usually, with the gift DVD, they write an article about the product (OS, distro, whatever it is), giving help for installation or/and for usage.
I read c't magazin regularly, and I appreciate its quality.

The german-speaking market (Germany, Switzerland, Austria) is not a small one. I could imagine that having a SolydXK DVD in this magazine would contribute very well to the popularity of the Solyds.

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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Crewp » 05 Oct 2013 22:37

I like your idea Jom :D

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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby marc » 10 Nov 2013 23:17

JOM wrote:There is an important and excellent computer magazine in Germany called "c't magazin". http://www.heise.de/ct/
Regularly, they include installation CD/DVDs in their issues, covering new and interesting OSes and/or software.
(This BTW is where I have first found an Ubuntu disk and decided to try Linux, back at the time when Unity in Natty Narwhal was released for the first time.)
Usually, with the gift DVD, they write an article about the product (OS, distro, whatever it is), giving help for installation or/and for usage.
I read c't magazin regularly, and I appreciate its quality.

The german-speaking market (Germany, Switzerland, Austria) is not a small one. I could imagine that having a SolydXK DVD in this magazine would contribute very well to the popularity of the Solyds.
it's not that seldom that servers collapsed shortly after being announced by heise online or inside of the c't magazine, so they usually take care that projects are big enough to handle such a huge rush...

i think it makes more sense to grow slowly and not through such a rush.

so i've posted some suggestions concerning social media to this thread:

http://forums.solydxk.nl/viewtopic.php?f=25&t=2032

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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby rokytnji » 11 Nov 2013 06:04

Schoelje said, How can they be reached (papers, magazines, news sites, etc)?
Well, this was How I started long ago. On a PENTIUM 3 no less. Video with Conky and Htop show this.

http://www.screenr.com/Mzj

We have gotten better than my pitiful attempts

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFWlej ... 5uE9opXukQ

It does not take a rocket scientist or a deep pocket user with funds.
Just some dedication to your distro and some free time.

Screenr is free and requires Java and gives a 5 minute timeline to make a video that can be uploaded to youtube.
You decide if you wish to publish/save the work or not. I bugged screenr when it first came out to give linux support
because back when it first came out. It was Windows and Mac only. So use it. like I said. No rocket science involved.

Just a dedicated, semi talented, forum member who advocates your distro is all that is needed.
I am spread to thin being a moderator plus a linux team member on 2 distros.
Plus I run my own Motorcycle Shop. Just look how late it is I am posting.

Happy Trails, Rok

Edit: By the way. http://yatsite.blogspot.com/2009/07/ins ... e-900.html
I did that ages ago also and any member can do the same with this distro with their own blog.
Between personal member blogs, personal videos, we recieved enough attention after a while
to get lots of reviews and attention drawn towards our distro. I did the same for Macpup also
which I am a team member also which drew attention to Macpup.

http://www.screenr.com/DAps

So google search "screenr solydxk" zero hits.
Youtube search : a lot better

I see a lot of youtube links in SolydXK facebook and blogs future I think.

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Re: Howto market SolydXK

Postby Graybyrd » 27 Nov 2013 12:00

This is my first post on the SolydXK forum.

Rather than suggest how to market this distro, I'd like to explain how I found it, why I was looking, and why I'm recommending it to people ranging from my 15-year-old grandson to an 83-year-old friend. Me? I'm 73.

Back in 1974 I was entering typesetting commands on a CLI dumb terminal attached to a phototypesetter I'd just bought second-hand for my weekly newspaper/printing business that we were converting from lead type to photo-offset production. Day after day, hour after hour, typing coded entries into a dumb terminal. A cheat sheet at my elbow to remember all those arcane commands.

Not much later, I was entering CP/M commands to a blinking prompt. Not long after that, it was DOS and command.exe.

So when Linux 'spurts insist I immerse myself in the magic and power of the CLI, I'm inclined to tell them I'd rather go back to a pointy stick and wet clay tablets. I've been there. There's a damned good reason we adopted the GUI. (Try telling your Grandmother that she's got to understand and memorize the contents of a 560-page O'Reilly Linux handbook to find out why the hell her recipe won't print! See how much steaming hot apple pie THAT suggestion will get you!)

I remember my first look at a Mac Plus running Pagemaker in the mid-80's. I'll bet a cold brew that 90 percent of everyone here has absolutely no idea of the profound ... repeat, PROFOUND impact that high-resolution, near-wysiwyg display connected to a postscript driven laser printer had on all of us involved with the printed (as from a printing press) word. I'm not wrong to say that day was magical. It turned the entire industry, world-wide, upside down and inside out. Not much later I got rid of that abominable photo-typesetter with the dumb terminal. We never looked back.

As time moved on, I converted a major printing business over to Macs and laser printers; and helped set up and establish a Mac-driven desktop publishing operation for a statewide public television network.

That's a little background.

When Microsoft bullied itself onto the world stage, it was the most abominable pile of clueless dreck we'd ever seen. At that moment, I knew we were lost. People chose cheap over quality, and everyone suffered. It's taken a long time for a clueless public to wake up. Hard on the heels of Vista, Windows 8 is finally driving home the point that the monster's head died years ago and its body is just now getting the message. The stench is driving people away from their complacency.

Come forward many years.

Retired but active, I began looking seriously at Linux. Apple moved way out beyond the reach of most desktop computer users; only diehards have the budget or need, and before dust can begin to settle on the monitor, it's been obsoleted. Apple grew contemptuous of its support base. When a billion people are fingering their iGadgets, the individual user no longer matters. Meanwhile, Microsoft is thrashing about in its death throes; it has no focus on its customer base.

Linux was a puzzle. The geeks didn't want to turn it loose. Vi was God, Emacs was Satan, and the cli was Valhalla. Virgins awaited the code warrior.

I tried Mepis linux. I could never convince it to recognize a plugged-in drive. "Use the cli!" I was told. After struggling with that, and trying to add apps I needed for my writing and publishing hobby, it became obvious that this was a turgid state of affairs. This was not a malleable product. Every important app, like the web browser, was three versions behind. The third time Mepis destroyed itself with updates, I wiped the drive.

All attempts to find a solid, working linux distro went pretty much the same way, except there did seem to be noticeable improvement with each successive version. Antix, CrunchBang, LMDE, Makulu ... all came close ... some came very, very close ... but still no cigar. I really hit the roof when I spent six months with LMDE/Xfce last summer and the last update "patch" totally borked it. I lost many, many hours of setting it up to do what I needed it to do.

This was a great way to win friends for linux ... not.

So I'm the perfect candidate: disgusted with MS, fed up with Mac, having years of personal and professional user experience with the evolution of desktop and small business computing in America ... and desperately looking for a linux that could, in the words of the early-day Macintosh evangelists ... "just work!" Please?

Distrowatch has a cool feature. They have a search menu where you plug in what you want, and it tries to come up with suggested distros out of the 37,984.75 available linux distros running loose out there (yes, I exaggerate, but not by much).

I like Debian. I like 'testing' and 'rolling' and a sensible desktop. (Who is the snert that wrote code for windows that wave like the Monday wash hanging on a clothesline? Sheesh! Get a life!)

And that's how I found SolydXK ... the Distrowatch search came up with LMDE (not again!) and SolydXK. SolydXK ?? Sounds like my kids diapers ... soiled Xkmt. Of all the hundreds I'd skimmed, this name came out of nowhere.

First clue to marketing: get this product out where people can find it. Keep it there. Encourage the reviews, refresh the websites, and do like the Mac evangelists from the early days. Talk it up, shout it out, and hang posters in every window. Be sure that when someone is desperately seeking, thine shall be found.

Acid test. As you might guess, I'm mightily fed up with distros that promise bliss but screech and snarl "CLI!" when I try to add something I need for my work. Steve Jobs, admittedly, was something of an ass, but he was right when he said, years ago, that no human being should ever be required to tell a computer something that it already knows! Linux geeks, are you listening?

I've got a sailboat that tends to get wet when the wind picks up. I use a laptop aboard with GPS navigational software. It's an older mil-spec rugged beast that won't leak. It's also a weird i386 beast. It eats linux and spits code fragments. Guess which machine I decided to test SolydXK on? Right ... (hehehehe)

The install went nicely; and displayed ... correctly. Good! This beast is hard to please, but so far, so good. Impressive. Some distros have choked and disintegrated before getting this far.

Wifi ... uh oh! Damned Broadcom driver ... early days ... not working. Tried entering home wifi router info. Nada. Dead.

Hmmm ... pulled wifi pcmi card from storage and plugged it into side port. Blink ... "Hello, Please?" pops up over the wifi icon in the tool bar. "What the ...?" Click on it, up pops the list of half a dozen nearby neighbors and my own signal. Click on it and it ... CONNECTS! (It remembered what I'd entered earlier!)

Okay, I'm half out of my chair at this point. This cannot be LINUX! No .. NOT Linux. This just ain't RIGHT!

Everything on that weird beast is working, now. Thumb drives, recognized. USB external hard drive, recognized. Wireless mouse, recognized. CD/DVD, video, everything I can throw at it ... recognized.

No, Charlie ... this ain't Linux! Is it?

To say that SolydXK has finally gotten it like Ivory Soap ... 99.9 percent purely good, is not an overstatement. Congratulations, guys. You brought it across the finish line.

Before the day was over, I'd installed it on one desktop and two laptop computers that I pound the hell out of. Each time, I applied the full update patch from the month following the DVD release. Each time, it was flawless. Nothing choked, nothing broke. I've added a ton of repo stuff, apps & libs & whatnot to make the machines do what I need.

I was totally blown away when I even got Kindle for PC to load and run under Wine (with a runtime C++ lib from MS added).

Second clue to marketing: you've got a winner here. Maybe you're not quite aware just how exceptional this distro is. Smooth. Polished. Complete. No need to tell it what it already knows! So keep it that way. Never let a bug stick around long enough to breed more bugs. Kill 'em. Get fanatical about it. Ford damned near went bellyup before they remembered a grim lesson they'd totally neglected during their years of arrogance. When it comes to keeping the market happy, Quality is Job One! That applies to software, too. Don't forget. Lose a user, you never get 'em back.

Hope this didn't exceed my welcome here.

Thanks for a really fine product. You've shown that talented folks can stand on the shoulders of giants, and grow much taller for their efforts.

=gb=


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