What does Solyd mean, really?

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Arjen Balfoort
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What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby Arjen Balfoort » 29 Jul 2014 14:36

It might not come as a surprise that running SolydXK is rather time consuming, and I'm putting that really mildly. The team is working out the best way to be able to continue SolydXK's present form and at the same time pursue my ambitions for SolydXK. I just had a one week holiday. Happy kids, happy wife, sun, beach, beer, good food, and enough time to step back, and look at things from another perspective. As a business consultant, I talk about the importance of an adequate view on one's business, and lately I wasn't doing that at all for SolydXK. With my eyes on details only, I lost sight of what it should be about...but, what is SolydXK really about?

Some words came to mind: stability, security, privacy, and I bet you can think of some more.

Stability is more or less guaranteed for the business editions (being based on Debian stable), but as we have seen with the last update pack, stability for the home editions is not (yet) within our reach. Partly this is a classical case of miscommunication: we do state on the product pages that the home editions are based on Debian testing, but we don't describe what it implies. We also needed to simplify maintenance on the repositories. That's why we made the decision to drop kdenext, and also to drop the multimedia repository from the next ISOs onward. Not everybody seems happy with the decisions, but they were necessary to further guarantee continuity with the small team we have.

Security seems implied when you use Linux, but is it really? We don't need to worry too much about viruses, and such, but we need to think about other people's safety as well. That's why we included ClamAV/TK in our previous ISOs. Unfortunately, the live installer is not capable of encrypting partitions, yet. It's going to be an ongoing discussion on what is needed for the best security, and also have the best user experience.

Privacy is something I personally worry about. It concerns me that there are organizations that jeopardize the internet's fundamental values, and invade our lives without us realizing it. I also find it worrying that a lot of people do not value their privacy, saying that they have nothing to hide. Apart from having DuckDuckGo as the default search engine in Firefox, SolydXK has no other ways of protecting the user's privacy. So, what can we do about that?

I found these articles by Ben Pearson on privacy illuminating (and short, which I like ;) ):
The State of Open Source: Privacy and Governance
The Proprietary Failure to Protect Privacy
The Open Source Solution to Privacy

What do you think about these subjects, and how do you think we can improve SolydXK on these matters?


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Zill
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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby Zill » 29 Jul 2014 15:41

Schoelje: Firstly, I want to welcome you back from your holiday and I am pleased that you had some good family-time. This should always be your top-priority. :-)

In general, I agree with the points you raised but with one exception. I really cannot see why any efficient Linux distro needs to be loaded-down with anti-virus software when there are no Linux viruses! Without malicious intent, it is impossible for us to embed a Windows virus into any documents generated by our Linux systems therefore such documents can be freely sent to Windows users without any concerns.

OTOH, while it may be possible that a Linux system can pass on an infected document received from a Windows system, I suggest it is not incumbent on the Linux system/user to act as a filter and "disinfect" such a document.

Windows users are responsible for their own systems and so it is their responsibility to run any necessary anti-virus software on any and all documents they receive.

Linux users are not "gatekeepers" and have no responsibility to police the internet by cleaning up Windows viruses. All we should be doing is keeping our systems as light as possible to show the world that the bloat of anti-virus software is simply unnecessary with Linux systems.

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby grizzler » 29 Jul 2014 17:07

Zill wrote:OTOH, while it may be possible that a Linux system can pass on an infected document received from a Windows system, I suggest it is not incumbent on the Linux system/user to act as a filter and "disinfect" such a document.

Windows users are responsible for their own systems and so it is their responsibility to run any necessary anti-virus software on any and all documents they receive.
While that is certainly true, there is no excuse for passing on an infection if your system doesn't even make the slightest attempt to block/remove it. I seem to remember there has been a court case about that in this country.
Frank

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby ScottQuier » 29 Jul 2014 17:12

Zill wrote: OTOH, while it may be possible that a Linux system can pass on an infected document received from a Windows system, I suggest it is not incumbent on the Linux system/user to act as a filter and "disinfect" such a document.
All legal considerations aside, at some point, we all, as individuals, have to step up to the plate and assume the role of our brother's keeper. The sociological ramifications of doing other-wise are very depressing.
Scott
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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby Arjen Balfoort » 29 Jul 2014 17:58

Okay, that's about viruses. What about the other subjects: Security - encryption, Privacy, and Stability?


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Zill
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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby Zill » 29 Jul 2014 18:11

grizzler/ScottQuier: Thank you for the replies but I, for one, have no intention of running unnecessary bloatware to slow down my, admittedly low-spec, machines simply to help feckless people who have chosen to run Windows rather than Linux.

I suggest that, to appease the altruistic users among the SolydXK community, an anti-virus application could be available as an option during installation. However, I strongly recommend that such an application is not installed by default.

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby jsalpha2 » 29 Jul 2014 19:19

+1 on the hopes that you had a pleasant vacation. With the switch to SystemMD and other changes to Debian, SolydXK is not the only distro having problems. Solyd is "Like A Rock." Keep your spirits up. Hopefully you can find a few more team members to take some of the load.

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby disciple1964 » 29 Jul 2014 19:19

Zill wrote:grizzler/ScottQuier: Thank you for the replies but I, for one, have no intention of running unnecessary bloatware to slow down my, admittedly low-spec, machines simply to help feckless people who have chosen to run Windows rather than Linux.

I suggest that, to appease the altruistic users among the SolydXK community, an anti-virus application could be available as an option during installation. However, I strongly recommend that such an application is not installed by default.

Zill,
While I understand your point about bloatware, I must say this, That kind of thinking is the reason that viruses are so easy to get. People have the freedom to use whatever software they want and feel comfortable with. But because people feel it's someone else's responsibilty for security, or the prevention of viruses, those who make them count on that ideology and successfully exploit it. Corporations have used the same ideology as it is someone else's responsibilty to make the internet safe and it has failed.

On the note of privacy, to me anyone who states I have nothing to hide is at best a "FOOL" it is not about hiding anything, but there is no reason for people to know everything about you, because they will use that against you in the way of racism, bigotry, hatred, political esponaige and downright evil. Your finances are YOUR business, How you raise YOUR children is YOUR business, What you buy and what you do is YOUR business. If I want you to know that information, Then it IS UP TO ME to tell you and no one else. Companies have no business knowing my buying habits or where I live, or how much money I make. Now there are exceptions, Schools, Government when necessary, Hospitals, employment and businesses that supply my water, gas and electricity. Facebook, Google, Amazon and the million other retailers, have no business what so ever thinking they have the right to control or know about my life. All they need to know is what they sold and how much. Unless they are shipping me something, they have no right to know my phone number, address or any financial information. It is because they have that information that the government can and does get information that otherwise they wouldn't know.

The most scariest thing to me is all computers are linked together in some form, so all your information is sitting on a hard drive at a company that you don't even know they have. Do you think that target and other retailers were hacked just for fun? Those companies know everything about you because they are linked to credit reporting agencies. Think not, go to Microcenter, use your credit or debit card and see if they don't have a list of places you lived! I know because I did and they asked me which address did I live at and I never used a card with them before that day. That scared the He** out me and I will never use any card at any of their stores, if I even do any business with them at all. I now pay for things in cash, and use my card only when it is absolutely necessary. I have cut down buying things online and I make sure to use only a few stores that I know so I can track what information they have. I no longer use facebook or any social media, outside of forums on tech sites.

Now I shouldn't have to do that, I shouldn't have to worry about viruses, or privacy but because of people with evil intentions and those who feel that privacy is dead and shouldn't be adhered to, I now have to jump through hoops to keep information out of people's hands that shouldn't have it.

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby rokytnji » 29 Jul 2014 19:36

Errr, I just run it because of another member here I know of, who I respect, recommending it.

Kinda went into it blindly on my netbook so to speak. I have not totally trashed it yet. But not through a lack of not trying to.
:roll:
So I guess that speaks for the Solid part of Solyd I guess. I am not your everyday Linux user though.
I'll keep it on my netbook just because I have enough testing irons in the fire.
Your testing is tame compared to my Sid/Mutimedia and Testing/Multimedia and other blind experimental installs.

Encryption, All my installs, even the 128MB SD card has that capability. With a encrypted save file if I so choose to use.

Security? I live in the boondocks where all folks do not even know Linux exists or care to. Which is fine and Dandy by me. I am not a preacher. So security hacks out here are non existent. Usually all we get is a traveling robber with a gun on a one way interstate. They always get caught out here. Not no exotic card cloner or hacker.

Shoot. I log in at run level 3 and use startx for starters. Zombieland for users out here.
Enough of my rambling. You have some better members here that can comment better than I can in this thread.
I just hope the gimme gimme posts don't burn out this small team with all the requests.
That is why I keep my pie hole shut usually.

Vacation is always cool. I love riding my scooters up to the mountains in summer and camp when I can. 8-)

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby kurotsugi » 29 Jul 2014 19:49

Security seems implied when you use Linux, but is it really?
AFAIK security is handled differently on linux. an antivirus might could "scan" and give you "such warn" but I highly doubt about the effectiveness to protect our system from such an attack. IMO the better solution would be:
- regular security updates
- selinux
- HD encryption
- ufw
Privacy is something I personally worry about.
how about... providing tor bundled browser in our repo? using a better DNS?

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby yoast » 29 Jul 2014 21:12

I think you sell yourself short on stability.

I have used SolydXK since January and I have experienced some glitches during/after updates that were solved quickly through the forums.

I have also had the occasional update problems in Windowsupdate and Ubuntu (only slightly less) but, on the whole I would consider SolydXK a very stable OS. Hardly ever stops or gives problems.

The complexity of the updates uinfortunately means that you need occasional minor interventions following updates. One thing that may make the situation look worse than it actually is is that many will use SolydXK to keep very old/slow/non-standard hardware running.

Thanks,
Please keep going.
Y.

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby fleabus » 29 Jul 2014 21:50

yoast wrote:I think you sell yourself short on stability ... I would consider SolydXK a very stable OS.
@Schoelje -

I agree with yoast, most emphatically. The way I see it UP Issues were beyond your control due to the coming freeze, testing in upheaval, systemd, etc...

And then all the things you're working on. Definite improvements. My Solyd installs are great. Thank you so much! :D

I'm so glad you had a good vacation, and some tome to unwind, be with family.

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby Fargo » 29 Jul 2014 22:55

Stability - Please define stability. 1) Does stable mean you can run your system non-stop without issues including updates and software installs? 2) Or does stable mean that you can expect issues during updates or software installs. But between updates you're stable?

For me, and I think most others, they think of Stable as #1. It just works all the time. Updates are seamless and program installs go without a hitch. As Schoelje mentioned, I think the Business Editions are good as far as stability. On the other hand I think the HE need some work. Saying they are stable just to make the team feel good about themselves doesn't help the people who have issues with updates. Thats not to say their work is not appreciated. But if I had to bet my business on running Microsoft and updating regularily or running it on SolydXK Home Editions and updating it quarterly. I would find Windows (any version since XP) much more stable than the HE. I have run Windows XP for nearly 13 years. I have never had to find a forum to fix an update issue. Unfortunately the same cannot be said for SolydXK HE. To me that says Windows is more stable. However, it is a different animal. Windows is more like the Business Editions since it is a fixed release. In the 7+/- years I have been using Linux, I have found that there is no such thing as a rolling release that is "Stable" its just the nature of the beast. Now SolydXK HE is the closest I have ever come to a stable rolling release. So that is indeed good and something to be proud of. But lets not mislead the newbie users and imply that the Home Editions will update as seamlessly as they are used to with Windows.

A great service was for me by Texstar at PCLinuxOS a few years back. I was looking for a stable distro that I could use day to day for a business. I had been a PCLinuxOS user in the past, but left due to some updating issues I had. I was hoping to hear that everything had since been worked out and updates were now seamless and I should come back. I did get that reply from many of the forum members. But it was Texstar himself who said for my needs to stay away from rolling distros. I'll admit that I was a bit shocked to hear the developer of the distro say this distro is not for you. After all, it seems the goal of every distro to be the biggest distro and have the most users. So why tell someone its not the distro for them. But he was right. He saved me a lot of headaches by knowing exactly what his distro was and who it was for. Rolling distros are great for sampling what is coming down the line in the near future. But they are not the work horse that a fixed release OS is.

Please don't take me wrong. I don't want to see SolydXK abandon the HE. I hope that someday it can be perfected and UPs can go as seamlessly as an update in the BE. But until that time, I do think we could be more clear to new users what it means to be on a rolling release.

In short, I think Schoeljes post is right on.

Security - I don't worry about viri with Linux, but what about someone hacking my system and using it for a data mining bot. It seems to me I have seen cases where such things are possible and linux is not immune to bad things happening. (Heartbleed etc) This is where my concerns are. I'm fine with having Clam AV and things included by default. But not necessarily running. If we do include ClamAV and other security programs, I suggest we create a Solyd Security Center where people can go and set up things like Clam AV, firewalls, parental controls etc. I believe Mageias control center has something like this. Please view this page and some of the links included at the bottom. http://doc.mageia.org/mcc/3/en/content/ ... urity.html

Privacy - This is something that concerns me greatly. I have nothing to hide, but I don't need everyone knowing everything about me. I don't know what measures can be taken in this regard, but it seems to me, if software is available, it is something else that could be included in the Solyd Security Center.

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby fleabus » 29 Jul 2014 23:24

Fargo wrote:Saying they are stable just to make the team feel good about themselves
Not my intent. Solyd HE is remarkably stable for a system based on Testing, especially in its current state. My HE installs have served me well.

On the other hand I forget myself here, as I am a tinkerer by nature and don't mind getting my hands dirty under the hood. It appears that we have now a large number of people who are new at this, more so even than myself, and, as you said, expect things to be seamless. Not true with Testing, no matter how hard one tries to smooth over the experience. So I suppose we failed in that regard.
Fargo wrote:In the 7+/- years I have been using Linux, I have found that there is no such thing as a rolling release that is "Stable" its just the nature of the beast.... But lets not mislead the newbie users and imply that the Home Editions will update as seamlessly as they are used to with Windows.
Well said Fargo. I do believe we kind of stepped on our own tail with that. Tried to be all to all. I did the same thing when I was supporting folks at work, ran myself ragged. Excellent post.

-- Dave

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby ScottQuier » 30 Jul 2014 01:23

Here's my take on this:
  • Stability - As has already been said, if one wants maximum stability then they want something that is NOT a rolling release. The BE, being based on Debian Stable, is one candidate ... at least until they promote Jessie to stable as I think the first little bit after that point will be an interesting ride. But, what do I know? :) The HE, being based on Testing are not going to be 100% rock. For some, there will be glitches and some of these will be major. For some reason, I've yet to have any sort of real glitch that wasn't caused by me not obeying the prime rule: RTFM. And, this is on 5 different computers. Some have been saying that Windows is stable, even through an Update. Well, I must be unlucky. I've had it happen twice where I had to do a complete wipe and re-install. Once was WinXP, the other was Win7. I'm just glad that I had current backups of my data and it was all on one partition. I've since learned!
  • Security - I'm on contract to the U.S. Navy, working in their IT department as an applications developer and DBA (SQL Server). There are some 16 - 20 individuals in the department, supporting some 300 users (yes, the ratio is a little out of whack). Easily 1/2 the FTE expended by the department is in an effort to harden the network and it's client computers. USCYBERCOM comes out with "Information Assurance Vulernability Advisories" on a continual basis. And, not just for MS products. But for everything that might be used by any US DoD agency. It's unreal. If the US Gov't is spending, literally, millions of US dollars and still come up short do you think there's any chance that anyone else is going to do much better? Security is a nice goal. Attaining a significant measure of system security is a pipe-dream.
  • Privacy - This is a simple one to look at. There is no way that an agency funded by "black" money is going to have any real problem snooping any place they get want, especially when they deem it unwise to obey the laws of their nation and do whatever they have a mind to do. If they want to snoop at someone's info, there is no way to prevent "THEM", short of disconnecting from all external communication technology. And, even then they can sit out on the street and gather intel on exactly which keys have been pressed and where the mice has moved and what the user has clicked on .... etc. For right now, privacy is another pipe dream.
  • The Solution will not be technological. It will be socio-political/economic in nature. Nation 'A' refusing to do business/trade with Nation 'B' until 'B' get's it's house in order would be one example. And, that's about as much as I think appropriate to say here. Any more and I think I would be violating at least one forum rules!
Scott
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systems is risky at best and entails serious compatibility
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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby patzy » 30 Jul 2014 04:21

Yes Solyd does give the impression of firm and reliable. From my point of view, I know that the Home Edition, being rolling, will have update difficulties. After all this is tracking Debian Testing that changes from day to day.
Newcomers to linux will not know that. So perhaps the marketing should be:-

Home Editions - for those who want the latest software and are willing to learn how to overcome any difficulties, particularly with updating. The Solyd forums are always willing to help with problems. (Personally I enjoy having to "sort things out").

Business Editions - for those who want a rock solid system with securitiy updates being available immediately.

On the matter of security/privacy. I too get annoyed with these "I have nothing to hide" people :evil: . I usually ask them what would happen if some extreme government got in power and decided that people using a certain website should be arrested/exterminated. (With the recent rise of extremism this is no longer in the realms of fiction).
I like to be private. The first thing I do with a new browser is add Ghostery and Startpage. If the browser can't use them, I don't use the browser. Firefox's HTTPS everywhere is a step in the right direction, too.
Maybe Solyd could have a forum on security/privacy that the installer points people towards. Of course the software mentioned should be easily available. (This would mean more work for our team. How would they find the time?)

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby _q_ » 30 Jul 2014 08:55

some very well thought out responses here!

being late to the party, i feel silly going back to the holiday part, but hey, glad you had a good one, Schoelje!!

(this is all too long for its value: feel free to scroll to the bottom for the condensed version :roll: )

while i get grizzler's point and other's on the virus thing, if a scanner gets put on my machine, i will rip it out or find a new distro. its not my job to make life easy on the microsoft wankers... i tried that for decades for pay and its futile. now that i am retired, i firmly do NOT do Windows... not even for my wife whom i love. some idiot who cant be bothered to run their own scanner when they need it is NOT my problem and i refuse to let it be. personally, i am hoping the Big One hits them and takes em out HARD. :twisted:

looking back on Schoelje's original points, it also goes against the goals here. Solyd is already a kitchen sink install, technically speaking.

dont get me wrong, that is part of what i LIKE about Solyd... i roll out a new K install and i change precisely two of the default applications and install two others and i call it a day.... over on the X version, i just have to install those two packages (maybe i really should be using X?) and then i ignore a bunch of stuff in the Office area... everything else i do or want to do is covered, including gaming on Linux. neat!!

however, adding stuff for systems we are all mostly morally opposed to is going too far. they are closed source people and feel they got it covered, so let's be polite and let them handle their stuff rather than meddle in their affairs.

as far as Solyd working out of the box, for me, on several pieces of dated and new hardware it has done so. the biggest problem i have is my spell chucker gets killed in my browser periodically (like now, pardon the typos) and i gotta fix it... the other "big" issue is my bar needs to be modified after install to list the stuff on my secondary display... Scott's post on how to fix it shows just how trivial my personal issues with Solyd are.

the updates... well, they have made it interesting once or twice on me... my other laptop was wonked out last i looked at it, but i been too busy to go through and fix it yet, but mostly, my biggest issue has been the spell chucker :lol:

that's pretty damn solid, no?

but even when we factor in the people that had total trian wrecks from it, its usually cause they didnt read the update notes or they have a non-standard install either in hardware or software... this ALWAYS causes grief in updates. (and i always just click it and run it myself... what can i say, i am a luser)

Hell, its only been the last decade that Redmond stopped releasing the potentially devestating updates that they used to roll out... and when M$ screws up, it does it HARD!

so yeah, a couple bumps and hitches now and again, but they are hardly a deal breaker... SPECIALLY running off a testing branch!

if i cared about it a lot, i would be on the BO version and add stuff from the home reps to it... just like i grabbed Dia from the BO side ;)

so this user feels that you are doing just fine at your goals.. even with some hitches... and even with devs getting code blinded by being down deep in the problems and not looking back at the whole project.

i also feel that to change things around like with AV scanners would be getting further and further off track of the goals.

security IS and should be VERY IMPORTANT. same with privacy. however, for the Solyd team to step up and start modifying Ff or Chrome or whom ever is WAY off point for the Distro Devs.

Make your OS tight and let the users discover which browsers or plugins they need to have their level of privacy maintained.... make some suggestions, but dont go meddling in browserland... NoScript is a handy lil plugin, for example, but it sure is some annoying nagware, when it comes down to it... most people just want to surf and not bother with clicking something to make their images load right and such... you will alienate users by stepping up too hard on that front.... just dont sell our souls to Amazon like some distros and Solyd has done their part on that front.

if you want to branch off and offer secure browsers and the like as options, that's cool... but wait until you get more devs before going that way.

that said, some encryption would be nice for sure... specially with Truecrypt being discontinued!

IF this was my project back in the day, i would say some focus on goals and basics would be the plan... i would focus on making the UM more user friendly... maybe have it start by opening the release notes page and/or giving a link to a thread on the latest updates FIRST... or whatever better idea for that there is... i might change the names from Home and BO to something more along the lines of Bleeding Edge and Boring just to make it clear... i went home cause i wanted games and not office stuff with almost NO thought to which reps were being used on the Debian side... course, i have used Debian Testing for production servers before (special use, not insanity) so i am strange.

a project manager who is NOT an active main dev might be a good idea... someone who does light work on the code side might do well for being an Overlord on the project goals and directions.

in short, my thoughts are Solyd is going mostly the right direction, its just understaffed and becoming mired down in firefighting rather than being able to be proactive.

it probably feels worse than it is on the dev side because mostly all you guys hear is how its broken and messed up someone's all important work on Chihauhua studies... meanwhile, the bulk of the users are using their install and using the forums to quickly find their solutions... cheer up, its better than it seems there behind the curtain :mrgreen:

crap, that was a lot of... well, CRAP!

the short answer: you are doing fine, keep at it and keep your eye on the big picture as you go... just cause you CAN do something does not mean you SHOULD do it.... and take more vacations! :ugeek:
Last edited by ScottQuier on 30 Jul 2014 11:03, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: off-color euphemism

SolydXK is such a delicious flavor of Debian!

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Zill
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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby Zill » 30 Jul 2014 11:17

Fargo wrote:Stability - Please define stability. 1) Does stable mean you can run your system non-stop without issues including updates and software installs? 2) Or does stable mean that you can expect issues during updates or software installs. But between updates you're stable?..
Debian defines stable as...
Understand that the job of Debian is, and always has been, to produce Stable. The other releases are means to that end. You may find the other releases perfectly usable for whatever use you have for them. Great. That wouldn't be much of a surprise to any longtime Debian user. Many users, including (of course) Debian Developers use them routinely.

Understand, however, that Experimental is experimental; things are expected to break from time to time. Testing is just what it says it is; it's for testing whether it works reliably prior to its release as a future Stable. You may well find Testing or Unstable reliable enough, and in fact others have remarked that Debian Unstable is more reliable than some other distributions' Stable releases.

Corollaries to this in the commercial world are Development, Testing, and Production. In theory, businesses don't let anyone anywhere near their Production servers until they've proven their latest release isn't going to break anything which currently works, and whose new features or functionality have been documented to the business's satisfaction. This is what Debian's Stable name means: that, once released, the operating system remains relatively unchanging over time.
See https://wiki.debian.org/DebianStability

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Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby mhwelsh » 30 Jul 2014 14:31

I have little to add.

Firstly I am delighted that you had a break with your family. Remember to look after your family because one day they may look after you!

I admire the effort and skills that have been put into Solydk and the mix of Stable and Exciting versions but surely an important feature of Linux is you have the choice to tailor it to your needs.

Keep up the good work if you get no feedback they must be happy!

martin welsh

Deleted User 2764

Re: What does Solyd mean, really?

Postby Deleted User 2764 » 30 Jul 2014 20:35

Welcome back, Schoelje! :)

As for security/privacy, that's an age-old argument. There are two very strong arguments for both sides. I don't think any OS (even Linux) is 100% secure. I think Linux is more secure than Windows or Mac or even Android because not many use it so we don't have a lot of criminals writing keyloggers, viruses, etc. However, that is catching up with us. Android (which runs on Linux kernel) has had a large upswing in viruses since it came out. However, I don't seem to worry too much about my phone (more on that in a moment). Also many things are now switching to browser based and not OS, since many spend more time in their browsers. Look at all the credit card/debit card breaches there were lately. How many of those servers were running on Linux? Anyone have any stats? Maybe that might be useful info on the present state of Linux security.

I don't worry too much because I'm not stupid enough to share a ton of rediculious links with people. Also I have things like AdBlock Edge (I prefer it over the default adblock pre-installed), NoScript, and Flashblock in Firefox. As for rootkits and OS viruses, I really don't seem too worried. How would they get in?

As for Business Editions, that's a nice thing to have "stable" but I've found out the hard way that it also means annoying bugs that need fixing aren't fixed where they are in the latest "testing" repo. This is the #1 reason I went back to Home Edition. Business Edition seemed too buggy and some features (especially new ones for arranging the KDE menu, and other things) were missing - things I was so used to using before. Home Edition suits me well.

Though I do wish to be even more cutting edge and maybe have KDE's newest, newest kernel, etc. However, as long as it works...

That's the other thing with me. I'm not too thrilled about spending hours trying to make something work or work the way I need it to. I'm from the "As long as it works, I'll use it" crowd, for the most part. Except if I'm volunteering to test something or if I'm writing code. That's the only exception. But for my everyday use and developing stuff, I want at least the main OS to work without fuss.

This past UP was kinda messy but it didn't turn out too bad. I updated ok.

Another thing I'm finding is despite things being "rolling", I still have to reinstall my OS every so often (especially if an UP process goes bad: I need to learn to clone a VM and do it there to test the process first). For now, I keep notes on fixes/updates and if there are quite a few, I restore a backup done in Redo Backup and then apply the updates and fixes, and then re-do the backup and drop my data back in (not much data, really). Pretty simple and not too time consuming (except the backup process itself but it's around 20 - 60 minutes depending on which laptop I'm backing up).

In short: I personally prefer that it works with as few bugs as possible. Security and privacy is a concern but I think the current tools installed with SolydK are good enough for me.

I hope you guys keep the HE editions as well. I rather have the latest bug fixes as soon as possible.

I remember when I was running Mint, I had always added PPAs from the original authors for KDE, Blender and Gimp, rather than use the repo version, because those I found I really needed the most recent versions.

I probably will never be a business user. What attracted me to SolydXK was someone "psst" me in the Mint forums (forgot who now... so sorry!) and I checked it out and liked the idea of it being Debian based, rolling distro instead of an Ubuntu based where I would have lapses between when the old LTS EOL's and the new LTS is available for installation. Also having to reinstall fresh each time a new version came out. If there's a lapse you'd be re-installing once a month for two or three months in a row.

Another thing I was thinking was just getting Debian Testing and rolling my own using PPAs from the authors for things like KDE, Firefox, Google Chrome (not Chromium), Gimp, Blender, etc. all the major programs I trust the most. But I hear that can break things?

See, that's the complexity of Linux that I think turns off some users coming from Windows: What to get? Where from? Will they need to reinstall often? Will they keep up with latest versions and bug fixes for software?

As long as SolydK HE is around and doing good, I'll keep using it.


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