Linux Printer installs

Talking about SolydXK, another distribution or totally off-topic but within the Rules ? It's the right place!
User avatar
MAYBL8
Posts: 1487
Joined: 10 Mar 2013 18:41
Location: Maryland Heights, MO USA
Contact:

Linux Printer installs

Postby MAYBL8 » 21 Sep 2014 13:43

Why can't Linux make it easy to install a printer like Windows or Mac's do?


User avatar
Snap
Posts: 1244
Joined: 25 Aug 2013 20:01
Location: Spain

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby Snap » 21 Sep 2014 14:55

AFAIK, Only full support for HP...

I always used HP printers long before embracing Linux, so... 8-)
This likely means that your installation is broken. -Mr Pixbuf.

Image

User avatar
Zill
Posts: 1850
Joined: 13 Aug 2013 14:28
Location: Lincolnshire, UK

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby Zill » 21 Sep 2014 14:55

Because Windows and Mac OSs are developed by large commercial organizations that are prepared to pay lots of money to developers (ho-ho!) to write the necessary software. In return they, of course, expect to make lots of money selling their OS.

Compare and contrast with the Linux model, where development is primarily done by those who actually want to do it, often for very little, if any, reward in return, other than knowing they have done a great job!

The obvious point here is that, if you wish Linux to make "XXX" easier, then it is up to you, the concerned user, to help make it happen. ;-)

User avatar
MAYBL8
Posts: 1487
Joined: 10 Mar 2013 18:41
Location: Maryland Heights, MO USA
Contact:

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby MAYBL8 » 21 Sep 2014 15:45

Don't you think this would be a good idea for the knowledgeable Linux guru's to do this?
It would benefit the community as a whole and help get people away from Windows and Mac's don't you think?
I am not smart enough. Wouldn't even know where to begin.
Just throwing ideas out here.
Can Ubuntu devs LInux mint devs Debain devs get together and form a combined effort for everyone to use.
Wouldn't that be great?
I guess I will quit talking I know that this conversation will go no where.


User avatar
Longshot
Posts: 147
Joined: 08 Mar 2014 03:30
Location: Batavia, NY
Contact:

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby Longshot » 21 Sep 2014 16:27

I agree, I know everyone wants to do their own thing and Linux is about freedom but if we could get rid of a few of the pointless destros and bring people together, Linux would be that much better.

User avatar
Zill
Posts: 1850
Joined: 13 Aug 2013 14:28
Location: Lincolnshire, UK

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby Zill » 21 Sep 2014 16:28

MAYBL8 wrote:Don't you think this would be a good idea for the knowledgeable Linux guru's to do this?..
I understand your point and agree that this would be a "good idea". Unfortunately, FOSS development does not work like this as their is no overall "Linux Megacorp" controlling its direction (thankfully!).

We are totally reliant on, often unpaid, volunteers to do the work and so, inevitably, they can choose what they wish to work on and when. Us users simply cannot dictate that we want a particular feature and so they must provide it!

All we can do as users it to get involved in the development side of GNU/Linux and, instead of demanding functionality, offer to help do some of the work in whatever way we can. Apart from the actual hard-coding of software there are many other options available to those of us with lesser skills such as writing documentation and raising formal bug reports. Even assisting with resolving problems on the Linux forums is a good way for us to help other users.

I have a great deal of respect for those who do develop our great OS, but I also greatly appreciate the collaborative work done by all active users at every level.

User avatar
Arjen Balfoort
Site Admin
Posts: 9333
Joined: 26 Jan 2013 19:36
Location: Netherlands
Contact:

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby Arjen Balfoort » 21 Sep 2014 17:07

The (printer) manufacturers are responsible for delivering the needed software and drivers for their products. They do so for MS and Apple because they have a large market share.

If we all would write those manufacturers to do the same for Linux, they will eventually need to change their opinion about Linux and see that it has a larger market share than they assumed.


SolydXK needs you!
Development | Testing | Translations

User avatar
PendragonUK
Posts: 41
Joined: 14 Apr 2014 17:03
Location: St.Austell, Cornwall

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby PendragonUK » 21 Sep 2014 17:28

The user experience on Linux of an HP printer owner is better than Windows. It goes to show "if" the manufacture puts the effort in we get what we need. I guess it's because HP sell computers as well and some of those computers come with Linux pre-installed. Brother along with most of the others just make printers.
Image
Image

User avatar
Zill
Posts: 1850
Joined: 13 Aug 2013 14:28
Location: Lincolnshire, UK

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby Zill » 21 Sep 2014 22:40

PendragonUK wrote:...Brother along with most of the others just make printers.
And, FWIW, I have not experienced any problems with Brother printers on my Linux systems. My Brother HL-2130 installed on SolydX OOTB with the Brother HL-2140 Foomatic/hpijs-pcl5e driver. Shared it across my LAN via NFS with other PCs and everything works fine. :-)

User avatar
ilu
Posts: 2541
Joined: 09 Oct 2013 12:45

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby ilu » 24 Sep 2014 15:15

Brother printers are perfect for Linux. They provide a script. My install took 2 minutes and went flawlessly with print, scan and fax. I posted a Howto on this site.

On the opposite I couldn't get a HP Printer to work in the past, still no solution for that one. I dumped it, bought Brother instead and never looked back.

The community can't do anything about printers/scanners as long as the manufacturer doesn't provide the necessary code. Only they are at fault. Same with other hardware (notebooks!), unfortunately.

But don't diss Brother they don't deserve it.

User avatar
disciple1964
Posts: 95
Joined: 03 Jan 2014 04:33
Location: Irving, Texas

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby disciple1964 » 25 Sep 2014 20:37

Hello,

Just FYI, I have a epson workforce 630. I just got the drivers from epson to make my scanner work in linux. All it took was installing them and then going into the epkowa.conf file and enable the network setting with ip of printer and the port(just use the default). once that was done, the scanner works flawlessly.

If someone has this printer Here is the info for setting up the scanner.

1. Go to http://download.ebz.epson.net/dsc/search/01/search/searchModule. Enter your printer model and select linux
2. Choose the drivers, AMD64 or I386, make sure to get the network driver, the core printer driver, fax and scanner

If you get a error about communications, Then follow this from the FAQ's make sure to click on the Here link to get the additional information.

Image Scan for Linux! fails to start when using the network plugin with the error: "Could not send command to scanner. Check the scanner's status.".

FAQ ID : LS00010
Created : 2009.04.14
Last modified : 2009.09.29

It is possible that your scanner is not supported by the network plugin. Consult /usr/share/doc/iscan-network-nt/NEWS or /usr/share/doc/iscan-network-nt-x.x.x/NEWS for a list of compatible devices. If your device is listed, please consult here for configuration instructions.

Here is the additional information for setup of the network capabilities as it is not enabled by default.

How do I set up and use the network plugin to scan via the network?

FAQ ID : LS00007
Created : 2009.09.14
Last modified : 2010.10.15

To set up your device for scanning via its network interface, follow the steps outlined below:

Download and install the latest version of Image Scan! for Linux from here.

If your device has a supported network interface, the iscan-network-nt plugin will also be available for download. Download and install the version appropriate for your system.

Now configure your device for network access. You need to set or obtain the IP address of the device. Please consult the product manual for details on how to do this.

Configure Image Scan! for Linux to connect to your device by editing /etc/sane.d/epkowa.conf. You need administrative privileges to do so. Read the instructions in the file about network configuration and add an entry for your device as indicated.

Finally, disable the conflicting epson2 SANE backend. You can do so by changing the line consisting of "epson2" to "#epson2" in /etc/sane.d/dll.conf. This will require administrative privileges.

Hope this helps :D

Lenovo T61P-6gigs-15.1Screen-250gig hard drive / Desktop: Quad core Intel Core i7-4790K CPU Kernel~3.19.0-49-generic x86_64 Mem~1621.5/15928.2MB HDD~1120.2GB
Registered Linux user 566308

User avatar
Nuke
Posts: 52
Joined: 27 Sep 2014 19:35
Location: Chepstow, UK
Contact:

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby Nuke » 29 Sep 2014 10:15

Zill wrote:Because Windows and Mac OSs are developed by large commercial organizations that are prepared to pay lots of money to developers (ho-ho!) to write the necessary software.
I don't believe so. MS and Apple are in the enviable position that they can sit back and let the hardware makers write the drivers for their own kit*. The reason is that if you are a hardware maker, unless you write a driver for Windows you will sell very little of your stuff.

In fact it is the other way round. I understand that hardware makers pay MS megabucks for the "privilege" of having the "Designed for Windows" stickers. As part of that deal, MS will have given the hardware maker low-level APIs (under non-disclosure) and if necessary other technical assistance with the OS interface. MS will then test the hardware in their labs to check that it does in fact work (they don't want that sticker debased), that the driver software conforms to the Windows look-and-feel and style standards, and is sufficiently simple to use (dumbed down if you like ;) ). Similarly with Apple, although I understand that Apple's control is even closer, as with them style is everything. The same goes for software.

So eg a "Designed for Windows 8" sticker on a printer does mean something worthwhile for a Windows 8 user, even if it also means it will stop working under Windows 9 :lol:

Hardware and software makers who bypass the "Designed for Windows" route or equivalent Apple certification are toast unless they are aimed at a niche market. Joe Sixpack and PHBs just won't buy it. That was a factor in WordPerfect's demise - they tried to go their own way with sofware that was good but did not meet the Windows rules, so did not get MS endorsment at a time when MS had become in most people's eyes the Gatekeeper to the PC world.

As for Linux, you need to keep to hardware manufacturers who either follow industry standards (such as Postscript printers, Hayes modems, and SCSI interfaces - because those APIs are generic) or who do provide drivers for Linux. With printers, that includes HP and there may be others (Brother it seems too).
Schoelje wrote:The (printer) manufacturers are responsible for delivering the needed software and drivers for their products... If we all would write those manufacturers to do the same for Linux, they will eventually need to change their opinion about Linux and see that it has a larger market share than they assumed.
Agreed, but they do not even need to write the drivers. They would only need to reveal the APIs for their devices and OS coders would do the rest. The makers will not do that however as it could reveal their industrial secrets at the hardware low level. I don't think writing to the makers would work. They look at figures like this :- http://www.netmarketshare.com/linux-market-share - about 1.5% market share. Even if it is probably a serious underestimate, they believe it.

* PS: In the days of DOS, MS did not have a monopoly so they did write their own hardware drivers. Drivers for things like keyboards and floppy disk drives were originally written by MS themselves and fortunately such devices are so boring that changes in fashion have left them alone ever since.

User avatar
Zill
Posts: 1850
Joined: 13 Aug 2013 14:28
Location: Lincolnshire, UK

Re: Linux Printer installs

Postby Zill » 29 Sep 2014 11:06

Nuke wrote:...MS and Apple are in the enviable position that they can sit back and let the hardware makers write the drivers for their own kit*...
On reflection, this may well be the way things work now so thank you for the detailed explanation.

Despite some printer manufacturers still trying to ignore Linux, this is not a new situation for us and, fortunately, the clever folk out there are always developing workarounds to get such hardware working. So, with a little persuasion, many hardware devices that have (regrettably) not been designed with Linux in mind can still be made to work.

However, the best solution for us is to vote with our wallets and only purchase hardware that has been proven to work with Linux. This makes life easier for us as users and ensures that our hard-earned cash only goes to manufacturers that do have good Linux support.


Return to “Open Chat / General Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests